Design Inspiration, Room Decor

A Dreamy Touch for Any Nursery Design

Sometimes a trend comes along that’s just so, well, dreamy that it’s impossible to resist. We’ve been swooning over the gorgeous dreamcatchers we’ve been spotting in the gallery lately—so much so, in fact, that we couldn’t NOT add our own version to The Project Nursery Shop. I mean, just take a look at these beauties!

Dreamcatchers from The Project Nursery ShopSouthwest Dreamer | Sweet Dreamer

Gorgeous, right? And here’s one of the things we love the most about dreamcatchers. You might think that they’re best suited for a tribal-themed nursery, but we’re here to tell you that just isn’t so. From modern and geometric spaces, to eclectic, bohemian designs, to superhero-themed rooms and everything in between, dreamcatchers officially have a place in every nursery and in our hearts.

Modern Nursery with Dreamcatcher Mobile - Project NurseryBaby Girl’s Mint, Black and White Nursery by allisonlalla

Modern Bohemian Nursery with Dreamcatcher Mobile - Project NurseryCara Loren’s Nursery

Dreamcatcher Mobile from The Dream Barn at Whitehall Farm on EtsyDreamcatcher Mobile from The Dream Barn at Whitehall Farm on Etsy

Kids Tent with Dreamcatcher Mobile - Project NurseryBohemian Camp Themed Nursery by AndreaAnderson

Gold Dipped Feather Mobile - Project NurseryA Brave Little Girl’s Modern Aztec Nursery by Courtney Eads

Feather Wall Hanging from Emu Studio on StorenvyFeather Wall Hanging from Emu Studio on Storenvy (similar to above)

Girl's Nursery with DIY Feather Mobile - Project NurseryHarlan Veil’s Whimsical Nursery by Michele Nordin Phillips

Dipped Feather Nursery Wall Hanging - Project NurseryIris’s Aqua, Coral & Yellow Pretty Boho Nursery by Amy Dodson

Nursery Dreamcatcher - Project NurseryAdam’s Modern Batman Room by younglovestory

DIY Dreamcatcher from Young Love StoryDIY Dreamcatcher from Young Love Story

Dreamcatcher Wall Hanging - Project NurseryGold and Coral Baby Nursery by Dano

Dreamcatcher Above Crib - Project NurseryHolton’s Tribal Themed Nursery by thefinaltouch

Dreamcatcher from Whispering Wildflowers on EtsyDreamcatcher from Whispering Wildflowers on Easy (similar to above)

Dreamcatcher Mobile with Paper Feathers - Project NurseryHarrison’s Geometric Nursery by Jessica Ruthardt

Paper Feather Mobile from Enchanted Pendulosity on EtsyPaper Feather Mobile from Enchanted Pendulosity on Etsy (similar to above)

For more inspiration or to upload photos from your nursery, big kid or party project visit our Project Gallery!

6 Comments

  1. 1

    Please don’t use another culture’s sacred items as a cutesy decoration for your baby’s nursery. Or if you must, please support Native artists who make them, rather than non-Native businesses who continue to profit from the desecration of Native American cultures.

    Also, I see two separate dreamcatchers labeled as “Aztec.” Aztecs didn’t have dreamcatchers. Dreamcatchers come from the Ojibwe. Of course, you also feature generic “tribal” nurseries, which feature a hodgepodge of elements that approximate Native art and artifacts, all of which are completely drained of their meaning and significance and are only being used because they’re trendy and “cute” to non-Native parents who haven’t the first clue what any of these items might mean to the people for whom these are important parts of their religion and culture. Please just stop.

  2. 2

    Thank you for your comment, Katie. We appreciate what you have to say and hope that you find inspiration elsewhere on our site.

  3. 3

    This is horrible cultural appropriation. I absolutely agree with Katie. She said it better than I ever could. You need to go back, read what she said, read what Native Americans have said about the misuse of their sacred items, then sit down and think long and hard about what you are doing. Or you can just dismiss it again so you don’t have to think critically, whatever.

    Non-Native American people who market their (honestly very pathetic) items as Native and Native “inspired” take away sales from actual Native Americans. In fact, it was such a problem that the United States government made it illegal to sell items marketed as “Native American” unless the person making that item is actually Native American. I have a feeling that you very carefully picked the names of the dream catchers you offered above to not violate this act. Because the Aztecs aren’t recognized by the United States, you can throw “Aztec, Aztec, Aztec!!!”” around all you want. But the other one is only named “Sweet Dreamer”… I wonder why that is.

  4. 4

    Thank you, Margaret. It was never our intention to offend you or any other Project Nursery readers, and we take your concerns to heart. Thanks again for bringing this to our attention. Our team is taking a closer look at these specific product names and descriptions.

  5. 5

    This is a beautiful thing to make for your child’s nursery. I believe anything you make with good intentions has your own meaning-LOVE. This is a well-intended project. So many things in this world are criticized and misunderstood, but love will always be love, and more so for a child’s room. I plan on making one for our son’s room to gaze up at from his crib and hopefully gaze in wonder at the moving feathers and when he’s old enough I’ll explain to him what Native Americans used them for.

  6. 6

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